Thursday, September 4, 2014

9702 November 2010 Paper 22 Worked Solutions | A-Level Physics

  • 9702 November 2010 Paper 22 Worked Solutions | A-Level Physics


Paper 22


Question 1
{Detailed explanations for this question is available as Solution 537 at Physics 9702 Doubts | Help Page 105 - http://physics-ref.blogspot.com/2015/04/physics-9702-doubts-help-page-105.html}



Question 2
{Detailed explanations for this question is available as Solution 370 at Physics 9702 Doubts | Help Page 67 - http://physics-ref.blogspot.com/2015/02/physics-9702-doubts-help-page-67.html}



Question 3
(a)
The centre of gravity of a body is the point at which the (whole) weight (of the body) appears / seems to act.

(b)
Uniform rectangular sheet of card if weight W suspended from wooden rod. Card held to one side as shown.
(i)
C - position of centre of gravity of card:
Point C is shown at the centre of the rectangle

(ii)
W – weight of card:
The arrow is vertically downwards, from point C

(c)
Card in (b) released. Card swings on rod and eventually comes to rest.
(i)
2 forces, other than its weight and air resistance, that act on card during the time that it is swinging. State where forces act:
The reaction / upwards / supporting / normal reaction force and the force of friction. The force(s) act at the rod.

(ii)
By reference to completed diagram of Fig, state + explain position in which card comes to rest:
The card comes to rest with (the line of action of) the weight acting through the rod so that the weight does not have a moment about the pivot / rod.





Question 4
{Detailed explanations for this question is available as Solution 652 at Physics 9702 Doubts | Help Page 130 - http://physics-ref.blogspot.com/2015/05/physics-9702-doubts-help-page-130.html}






Question 5
Student studying water wave in which all wavefronts are parallel to one another. Variation with time t of displacement x of a particular particle in wave shown.
Distance d of oscillating particles from source of waves is measured. At a particular time, variation of displacement x with this distance d shown.
(a)
Define, for a wave:
(i)
The displacement of a wave is the distance (of a point on the wave) from the rest / equilibrium position.

(ii)
Wavelength is the distance moved by wave energy / wavefront during one cycle of the source
OR the minimum distance between 2 points with the same phase
OR minimum distance between adjacent crests or troughs

(b)
Use Figs to determine, for water wave,
(i)
Period T of vibration:
T = 0.60s

(ii)
Wavelength λ:
λ = 4.0cm

(iii)
Speed v:
v = λT              or         v = f λ and      f = 1/T
v = 6.7cms-1

(c)
(i)
Explain whether wave is losing power as it moves away from source:
The amplitude is decreasing, so the wave is losing power.

(ii)
Ratio of intensity of wave at source to intensity of wave 6.0cm from source:
Intensity, I (Amplitude, A)2
At source, A = 2.0 and at distance = 6.0cm, A = 1.1
Ratio = 2.02 / 1.12 = 3.3



Question 6
{Detailed explanations for this question is available as Solution 501 at Physics 9702 Doubts | Help Page 97 - http://physics-ref.blogspot.com/2015/03/physics-9702-doubts-help-page-97.html}





Question 7
Results of alpha-particle scattering experiment provided evidence for existence and small size of nucleus.
(a)
Result that provided evidence for
(i)
Small size of nucleus, compared with the atom:
Most α-particles were deviated through small angles

(ii)
Nucleus being charged and containing majority of mass of atom:
A small fraction of the α-particles were deviated through large angles greater than 90o

(b)
Alpha-particle in this experiment originated from decay of a radioactive nuclide. 2 reasons why beta-particles from radioactive source would be inappropriate for this type of scattering experiment:
Any 2 sensible suggestions:
e.g. β-particles have a range of energies
β-particles are deviated by (orbital) electrons
β-particle has a (very) small mass




6 comments:

  1. pls show me how to do w10_qp_12 question no. 34

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. check solution 104 at
      http://physics-ref.blogspot.com/2014/11/physics-9702-doubts-help-page-19.html

      Delete
    2. please explain Q1 part b how to do it via scale drawing

      Delete
    3. The scale vector diagram is now included

      Delete
  2. why not v*2 =u*2+2as used in 2(a)(!! part 2)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We can calculate the vertical component of the initial velocity (u in the equation you stated) but we do not know the vertical component of the final velocity (v in the equation you stated). So, we do not have enough data to calculate the height (s in the equation you stated).

      Delete

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